Save The Albatross!

Pam Longobardi Spiritual Revolution Yoga from Pam Longobardi on Vimeo.

Funds from the sale of each Longobardi designed yoga mat will be donated to support Oceanic Society’s, “Albatross Adoption Program.” Oceanic Society has initiated an Albatross Adoption program, which will directly fund research on the impacts of plastic pollution on seabirds, outreach and education about the issue, and habitat restoration efforts on two of the Laysan and Black-Footed Albatross populations main breeding sites, Midway & Kure Atolls.

The Soaring Albatrosses Mat from artist Pam Longobardi / image: joelongophotography

The Soaring Albatrosses Mat from artist Pam Longobardi / image: joelongophotography

These birds live and nest on remote Hawaiian Islands, and parent birds regularly fly as far north as the Aleutian Islands to collect food—feeding in many cases directly within the North Pacific Gyre, where billions of pieces of plastic pollution now concentrate. Ingesting plastic objects while feeding here, the parents subsequently return to the nesting sites and regurgitate them to their chicks. The consequences of which may lead to the chick dying from dehydration, punctures to the digestive organs, or possibly from the pollutants associated with (or in) the digested plastic. Longobardi has teamed up with Spiritual Revolution, donating her time and artwork, to encourage behavioral change to reduce single use plastic consumption. To learn more about Pam, her art, research, and activism, and other amazing things she is doing for the Earth and its inhabitants, please click here. To go out in nature with Pam, please click here.

No PVCs = Happy Ocean

We are not perfect, but we are working hard to provide you a beautiful AND safe product.

Our mats are free of PVC (polyvinyl chloride) and phalates. We use water-based inks and a 100% biodegradable, recylable, eco-friendly, natural tree rubber base, bonded to an ultra-absorbent suede cloth top that increases grip as you sweat. Any plastic used by Spiritual Revolution is 100% biodegradable.

What does this all really mean?

Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineering faculty member at the University of Georgia, explains in this PRI article, “We’ve seen this huge increase in production in plastic that results in an increase in the waste stream as well. Unlike material that biodegrades, plastic has all of these issues. It easily travels into waterways, it physically fragments into smaller pieces which are extremely hard or impossible to collect, and [it tends to] absorb chemical contaminants that are already in the environment.”

image: joelongophotography.com

image: joelongophotography.com

 

The same article goes on to state, “Some 5.3 million to 14 million tons of plastic, or up to 4 percent of the roughly 330 million tons of plastic produced each year, entered the ocean as trash in 2010. The figure is expected to increase 10-fold in the next decade as more plastic is produced and subsequently evades waste management and recycling efforts, according to a study Jambeck and colleagues published earlier this year in the journal Science.”

We don’t believe in being angry activists or using scare tactics, but we all have a role to play in helping to preserve and sustain our beautiful home for future generations.